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These are a favorite at our house. My Ganky (my mom’s sister) made THE best. This is a slight variation on her original recipe. We thoroughly enjoyed these. I always wonder why I don’t make them more often. Let me know if you have any other questions. Or if you think I misspoke or left something out.

NOTE: The pastry cutter I used in the picture below can be purchased here.  I honestly don’t think I paid that much for mine, so you might check at your local kitchen stores before ordering.  It got one bad review on amazon but I have really loved mine.  I think maybe the person reviewing it was a bit rough with it!  I have had no problem whatsoever.

Your dumplings can be made way ahead and frozen. But make them at least a few hours before so they will be very well chilled if not frozen.

  • 2 1/2 cups all purpose flour
  • 2 tsp salt

Stir together and set aside.

  • 1/2 cup all vegetable shortening ( I know lard would be amazing but I have never tried it -quite sure my Ganky used regular Crisco)
  • 1 cup boiling water
  • 1 large egg, well beaten

Put the shortening in a heat proof bowl and pour the boiling water over it. Stir to melt the shortening. When it has melted pour this into your flour/salt, stir a couple of times, then add the egg

Stir with a fork until well blended. Then give it a little beat with a wooden spoon to be sure you get all the flour off th bottom of the bowl.

Cover and set aside for 30 minutes to rest.

On a well flour cloth with a well floured rolling pin, roll out the dough using a approximately 1/4 of the dough at the time.

Cut into strips or squares using a knife or pastry cutter.

Layer on a parchment or waxed paper lined cookie sheet, putting parchment or waxed paper between the layers of dumplings.

Place a piece of parchment or waxed paper over the last layer and then wrap in plastic wrap and place in the freezer while you prepare your chicken. If however you are making these days or even weeks before you intend to use them, they freeze very well. Simply allow them to become completely frozen and then remove them from the cookie sheet and put them in a zipper freezer bag, label them with the date and return them to the freezer, using them within 3 months.

I have a large white enamelware pot I make dumplings in. But a dutch oven or soup pot with a good fitting lid will do.

Boil a chicken or enough chicken pieces to make a rich broth in enough water to cover the chicken well. Salt and pepper to taste. You certainly may need to add more water as the chicken cooks. But keep it well covered with water. After chicken is completely cooked remove from the broth to cool and when cool enough, pick meat off the bones and return it to the broth. To the broth add 2 (16 ounce)cans chicken broth, 2 chicken broth cans of water and 2 cans cream of chicken soup. Bring this to a rolling boil and stir so the cream of chicken soup is well incorporated.

cd13

Drop the still VERY cold or frozen dumplings into the boiling pot one at a time, shaking to move the dumplings around so they don’t bunch together but DO NOT STIR.

ck12

When all your dumplings are added to the boiling liquid. Turn the heat down to simmer and put the lid on your pot. Cook undisturbed for 25 minutes. If you like add a little more freshly ground black pepper to the pot.

ck11

Serve right away while piping hot! We usually do not have any sides with this – just dumplings…and more dumplings.

cd101

A plain and simple meal. And I told you, they are easy!!!

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I really, REALLY need you all to read over the text for my Biscuit Making 101 booklet I am handing out at my first cooking class.  Tell me honestly what you think and if it is enough information.  Just pretend you have never made a biscuit in your life.  What do I need to add?  Leave out?  Just tell me what you think. Thanks!!!

Here is what I have so far:

Biscuit Making 101

Very Important Announcement:
THE BRAND OF FLOUR YOU USE MAKES ALL THE DIFFERENCE IN THE WORLD IN HOW YOUR BISCUITS TURN OUT.
I am not even kidding you.
Here is a list of the flours I have tried and what I have found to be true about each of them.

  • Gold Medal Self Rising: Not good for biscuits AT ALL.  Very packy, dense biscuits.
  • Sunflower Self Rising: Again, packy, dense—better than Gold Medal but not what I wanted at all.
  • Martha White Self Rising: Same old, tired story.  Just not up to par.
  • Pillsbury Self Rising: Same song, different day.
  • Wondra: Blah, Blah, Blah
  • White Lily Self Rising: Folks, we have a winner!  Light, fluffy PERFECT texture   biscuits.  Hands down, THE BEST!

You may tell yourself that you don’t really care about WHY White Lily is the best, but you should! And even if you don’t, I am going to tell you anyway!  It is 100% soft winter wheat and it has a much lower protein content.  And the facts are: less protein = better for quick breads and more protein = better for yeast breads.  Also, handling your biscuit dough too much result in developing the gluten (all very scientific) and in quick cooking bread, muffins and biscuits~this is a no-no.
You have to trust me on this: ALL FLOURS ARE NOT CREATED EQUAL.  And quite honestly, they shouldn’t be.  Different flours~different uses.  Makes perfect sense.  It also makes perfect sense to use the right ingredients for the recipe.  What are we trying to teach in our children??? A job worth doing is worth doing right.  This certainly goes for cooking and baking as well.  Without a doubt, having the right tools and proper ingredients can make a good cook into a great cook!  Having the right    instruction and technique makes things even better.

There are so many little hints and helps in cooking and baking that can make all the difference in the world.  Take heed when you learn something new.  Write it down.  Keep a kitchen notebook.  And ask yourself why.  Asking why and getting the answer will make it memorable.  For example, not twisting the biscuit cutter when you cut  your biscuits makes a huge difference in how they rise when baking.  No joke ~ makes a HUGE difference.  That tiny little tidbit is essential information in my opinion.  So, therefore, I am passing it on to you.  Now don’t forget!

Now for the fat content of your biscuits~again VERY important. Unless you are vegan there is no reason NOT to introduce a tiny bit of animal fat in your diet from time to time.  None of us eat biscuits every day.  If you make yours from scratch then time constraints alone prevent it.  Maybe our grandmothers did but it just doesn’t fit into our already ridiculous schedules.  So here is where I drop the bomb shell.  The very best, most tender, flaky, perfectly textured    biscuits must be made with lard.  You read that correctly.  LARD.  Cheap, old animal by-product lard. You are welcome to render your own, but the bucket or box at the grocery store is more than sufficient.  If you just can’t bring yourself to use all lard, then use half shortening or even butter.  But don’t complain if your biscuits are not light and fluffy because they won’t be.  If you really want to get crazy make your biscuits using part duck fat.  OH MY!  I can’t describe them.  They are amazing.  But hey, I like just about anything cooked with a little duck fat.

Frankly, I think fat is a much misunderstood ingredient in fine cooking.  You cannot cut fat from your diet and if you think I am nuts, read Sally Fallon’s book Nourishing Traditions.  Not the gospel of healthy eating but raises some very good questions.  And I look at it like this: That lard biscuit I eat once or twice a month will not be what kills me.  So ENJOY!

The next important factor is the liquid you add.  Not just WHAT but the amount as well.  I personally, use only Bulgarian Style Buttermilk.  It is thick and tangy ~ two very important things to look for in buttermilk.  I much prefer the Foremost brand in the waxed paper carton. It is fresher and well, I hate for my food to be stored in plastic.    Anyway, there is a BIG difference in the types of buttermilk and how things will turn out using each one.  Oddly enough, buttermilk is relatively low in fat and considered yet another animal fat~since it comes from cows~duh! And what have we learned so far?  Animal fat = delicious!
Back in the day it was what was left after butter was churned.  Now, it is just whole or skim milk with lactic acid bacteria added for fermentation.  Let me just get this out of the way before we go any further: Adding lemon juice or vinegar to milk does NOT        Buttermilk make.  So stop right there if you are considering it.  Go ahead, splurge on the cultured buttermilk and don’t worry about the date and if you will use it before the date runs out.  IT IS SOUR MILK.  If it isn’t growing something green, then it is still fine to use past the date.  Using buttermilk gives your biscuits that tart, tiny bit salty taste that just makes you go mmmmmmmmmmmmmmm.

The amount of liquid added is very important.  If your recipe says 1/2—2/3 cup then start with the 1/2.  If it is a nice crisp dry Autumn morning, you might have to add a bit more.  If it is humid or rainy, the 1/2 might be enough.  You can add more, but you can’t take any back out! And if you have to start adding flour…well you are cooking up a recipe for disaster!

On to TEMPERATURE.  OH SO important.  Both in your raw ingredients and the baking temperature.  Chill your ingredients.  In fact, keep your flour in the freezer and your lard in the refrigerator.  Then you are always ready to whip up a batch of biscuits.  And preheat your oven to 500 degrees.  That’s right.  FIVE  HUNDRED DEGREES.  No more, no less. This insures a quick “shock” to the cold biscuit dough and whoop ~ a terrific, tall beautiful biscuit!

If making biscuits for breakfast I mix my flour and lard and put it back in the refrigerator, covered, until I am ready to mix in the buttermilk. They bake for 15-18 minutes so I try to time having my other food started and then getting my biscuits ready to bake.  Don’t let your ingredients come to room temp even after you mix the flour and lard.  Keep it chilled.

Here is where you can decide what biscuit is perfect for your taste.  Do you like soft sided biscuits?  If so, place them close together on your pan. Do you like them very crispy on top?  Brush them with milk or melted butter before baking. Do you like “layers” ? Then fold your dough over on itself a couple of times before cutting.

Always brush them with melted butter as soon as they come out of the oven. Oh please, you know you want to.  What’s a little more butter in the scheme of things?

That’s it – still have to add the recipe and a few more little hints.  Please be honest…is it easy to understand?  Enough info?  Too much info???

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